Emilia Simeonova, PhD

Emilia Simeonova, PhD

Assistant Professor

Academic Discipline: Economics

Areas of Interest:
Health Economics,
Children's health,
Development Economics


Phone: 410-234-9398

Email: emilia.simeonova@jhu.edu

Biography

Emilia Simeonova, PhD (Economics from Columbia University in 2008) joined Johns Hopkins Carey Business School in 2013 from Tufts University. Between 2011-2012 she was a research fellow at the Center for Health and Wellbeing at Princeton University. Emilia’s research interests in the economics of health care delivery, patient adherence to therapy and the interaction between physicians and patients, racial disparities in health outcomes, the long-term effects of shocks to children's health and the intergenerational transmission of health.  Her research has been funded by the National Institutes of Health, the National Science Foundation, the Swedish Research Council and the Danish Academy of Sciences. 

Honors & Distinctions

  • NBER faculty research fellow

Selected Publications

  • Doctors, Patients and the Racial Mortality Gap, forthcoming, Journal of Health Economics
  • Young Adult Obesity and Household Income: Effects of Unconditional Cash Transfers, with Randall Akee, William Copeland, Adrian Angold, Jane E. Costello, 2013, American Economic Journal – Applied Economics (lead article)
  • Marriage, Bereavement and Mortality: The Role of Health Care Utilization, 2013, Journal of Health Economics
  • Public vs. Private Provision of Charity Care? Evidence from Hill-Burton Hospitals in Florida, with Douglas Almond and Janet Currie, 2011, Journal of Health Economics

Works In Progress

  • Education, Health and Mortality: Evidence from a Social Experiment, NBER Working Paper 17932 (with Costas Meghir and Marten Palme)
  • Gender Empowerment in 19th Century Sweden: Using Historical Trade Shocks to Assess the Effects of Women’s Economic Empowerment (with Andreas Madestam)
  • Education, Health and Cognition, NBER Working Paper 19002, (with Costas Meghir and Marten Palme)
  • Does Women’s Education Affect Breast Cancer Risk and Survival? Evidence from a Social Experiment in Education (with Marten Palme)