MS in Finance

  • Federico Bandi
    “Our goal is to educate the finance professional of the future: deeply knowledgeable in an area of expertise and yet well-rounded; focused on the maximization of shareholder’s value and yet socially responsible.” Federico Bandi | Faculty | MS in Finance
  • Lu Gao
    “When I was an intern at one of the big four accounting firms, I helped my supervisors to build financial statements every day and I think my classes were very helpful in improving my applicable skills and knowledge.” Lu Gao | Student | MS in Finance
MS in Finance

With the MS in Finance, you’ll go beyond the numbers to understand the larger impact—and responsibility—finance has in a global economy. Broaden your perspective by studying and learning from renowned Carey faculty and other Hopkins experts.



36 credits, 1 year (full-time) / 2 years (part-time)


$64,000 (full-time) / $1,290 per credit (part-time)


$100 Application Fee

$500 Matriculation Fee (Full-Time)

$250 Matriculation Fee (Part-Time)

Inside Look Into MS in Finance

Program Features

The MS in Finance (MSF) program develops managers and specialists who understand the importance of transparency, responsibility, accountability, and fair and equitable treatment of shareholders for good corporate governance practices. The program features:

  • Johns Hopkins University world-class faculty and experienced practitioners in the field of finance.
  • A significant part of the finance curriculum devoted to the CFA Institute’s Candidate Body of Knowledge, preparing our students to sit for the CFA exams.
  • Strong theoretical and practical foundations in corporate finance and valuation, corporate governance, and securities analysis and investments. 

Download program brochure

Sample Curriculum

The full-time, 36-credit MS in Finance is ideal for students with limited or no professional work experience, while the part-time program was created for working professionals advancing in their careers. Both formats are offered at the Carey Business School’s Baltimore and Washington, D.C., campuses. Part-time students may also choose to take classes online.

The curriculum for the MS in Finance program includes the following courses, but course sequence and availability of specific electives may vary. Students must consult with an academic adviser to ensure that they take courses in the approved sequence.

Business Foundations (16 credits)

  • Accounting and Financial Reporting
  • Statistical Analysis
  • Business Communication
  • The Firm and the Macroeconomy
  • Economics for Decision Making
  • Corporate Finance
  • Investments
  • Business Leadership and Human Values 

Functional Core (8 credits)

  • Financial Modeling and Valuation
  • Financial Institutions
  • Derivatives
  • Fixed Income

Finance Electives (12 credits)

  • Managing Financial Risk
  • Entrepreneurial Finance
  • Corporate Governance
  • Advanced Financial Accounting
  • Quantitative Financial Analysis
  • Advanced Corporate Finance
  • Financial Crisis and Contagion
  • Advanced Portfolio Management
  • Data Analytics
  • Mergers and Acquisitions
  • Wealth Management
  • Financial Econometrics
  • Continuous Time Finance
  • Advanced Hedge Fund Strategies

Students who complete this program between May 2017 and August 2017 are eligible to continue their studies in a complementary new area with Carey's Second Degree Option. More information is available on the Second Degree Option page

Tuition & Fees

For Academic Year 2016-2017

  Tuition Application FEE Matriculation Fee Registration Per Semester Graduation Fee
Full-Time $64,000 (for entire 12-month program) $100 $500 $0 $0
Part-Time $1,290 per credit $100 $250 $0 $0

All fees are nonrefundable. 

  • Late Registration Fee: $250
  • Late Payment Fee: $250
  • Returned Check Fee: $35
  • Payment Plan Termination Fee: $75
  • Delinquent Account Collection Fee: 25% of the outstanding debt

Learn more about the financial assistance available to students.

Featured Story

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The “balanced scorecard” has emerged in recent decades as a popular workplace tool for appraising and rewarding employee performance. A new study finds evaluators using a balanced scorecard tended to award high ratings and bonuses to employees who performed well financially, rather than to those who scored well in corporate social responsibility.

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